Worse Than Spilled Covfefe

During his 4th of July speech, Donald Trump said “In June of 1775, the Continental Congress created a unified Army out of the Revolutionary Forces encamped around Boston and New York, and named after the great George Washington, commander in chief. The Continental Army suffered a bitter winter of Valley Forge, found glory across the waters of the Delaware and seized victory from Cornwallis of Yorktown.

“Our Army manned the air, it rammed the ramparts, it took over the airports, it did everything it had to do, and at Fort McHenry, under the rocket’s red glare it had nothing but victory. And when dawn came, their star-spangled banner waved defiant.”

Such a glorious turbulent inkbath of words deserves a closer look.  In 1775, the Continental Congress created a unified Army out of the Revolutionary Forces encamped around Boston and New York, and named after the great George Washington, commander in chief.  They called it the great George Washington, commander in chief army.  The Continental Army (wait a minute – that’s not the great George Washington commander in chief army – they changed their name!  (anyway, moving on) suffered a bitter winter of (sic) Valley Forge, found glory across the waters of the Delaware and seized victory from Cornwallis of (sic again) Yorktown.  Actually, although he sort of glossed over the 5 years between the crossing of the Delaware and the victory at Yorktown, this part is not historically inaccurate.  Now we go to crazy town.  I’ll just print the whole thing again: “Our Army manned the air, it rammed the ramparts, it took over the airports, it did everything it had to do, and at Fort McHenry, under the rocket’s red glare it had nothing but victory. And when dawn came, their star-spangled banner waved defiant.”
Honestly, I think reporters from now on should restrict their questions to things like “What war was the battle of Fort McHenry in?,” or “What century were airplanes invented,” or “What’s a rampart?”  Because he would not know.

 

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